Diwali Boy's Last Dance-A Satire Feat
Mohit Charnalia

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Synopsis

Diwali Boy's Last Dance is a satire on corporate crime. It is the story of the struggle of a reasonably honest group of people to define their attitudes towards corporate wrongdoing. Should they be completely honest, or completely dishonest, or somewhere in between, depending on circumstance? Does corporate life amount to a life of adhoc honesty? Is it a continuous dance of flexible ethics, where you take two steps forward and two steps back, keeping time to the criminal heartbeat that runs through the country’s DNA?

This story revolves around the struggle of Samir, who is a 'good boy' in his own eyes, as he comes face to face with the well entrenched demon of corporate crime in India. Samir encounters professionals who are criminals and criminals who are professionals. It is a world of cheating, back stabbing, frauds and bribes. His first impulse is to flee, but when he realises that corporate criminals are all around him and come in surprising and sophisticated shapes, he is left with no option but to fight back; but how do you fight the corporate Raavan with multiple heads? Through honest means or do you have to become a thief to catch one?

With his back to the wall, Samir gambles it all on that one last dance.

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Mar 08 '15
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Mar 01 '15
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Suman Chhabria Addepalli

Really liked whatever I read till now; the book starts spectacularly, indicating that the protagonist is in some kind of serious problem. I liked how the story leads you into feeling it is just like your own story, that of a middle class, hardworking person who believes what is told to them, and has still can't comprehend nor is familiar with the devices and schemes of the corporate world. The story of Samir and Anirban until now (what I've sampled) makes me hungry to know what happens next. Also the twist with Nisha's entry and the obvious disappointment that simple - Samir is about to face, makes my heart reach out to him. This has happened to most of us - Also, i like the fact that in the background so much gyaan about the banking sector is given. Love the innocence in the writing!

Feb 26 '15
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Mohit Charnalia

Thanks for reading, Suman

Feb 26 '15
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Deepak Kaul

The jump from the dance bar scenario, which instantly captures your attention, to the past is too dramatic. It should have been split into separate chapters. Once he gets into detail of the father and Singh scene, the dance bar impact fades.

Feb 25 '15
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Neeraj

The three chapters kept me mesmerized - the book is written in a fluent and easy to read way. Very relatable!

Feb 25 '15
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Pradeep Sethi

The storyline is quite vivid

Feb 06 '15
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pandustar

I cant find any fault in the 1st three chapters so much so that I re-read the whole thing again - it is pure brilliance. Since I feel that I should put something negative (else you would not do a better job next time around) I feel that the chapters are a tad bit too long - if you could break them up I think you would have a loyal fan following.

Feb 02 '15
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readerfan

You can read it very quickly. Its an Indie-book. At first you nearly feel the echoes of all Indian authors past. Then its a new book, maybe it will be about the righteousness or just the dilemmas of Diwali Boy. Chapter 4 is awaited. Good first book material.

Jan 30 '15
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Coffee

Good first three chapters, the characters are believable. Can picture the back office chatter between the bankers at our own bank. I do hope though that Ms. V is not actually going to take off with Mr K, that would be too obvious a stereotype.

Jan 20 '15
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Dharma

Interesting read. Lucidly comes out with the Indian middle class setting and the aspirations... Look forward to reading the full book. Kudos to the new author Mohit on touching upon such a tricky yet important concept in the Indian middle class lifestyle in a nice way laced with humour.

Jan 14 '15
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Aneesha Myles Shewani

I am reviewing the first chapter because that is how far I read this book excerpt today. I am so glad for the recommendation to read this brilliant work. The writing style is fluid, the language well embellished and the story has a lot of promise. I can imagine a Bollywood movie in the making with the storyline. The humor is subtle and cheering. My compliments to the writer and I will be coming back to read more. This is a promising work of hard labor and deep insight. It will be a pleasure to read it in print.

Jan 14 '15
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Rajshree Chauhan

The wrting style is what kept me hooked till the end. Brilliantly written, it was a little slow in the beginning though. Would definately read it if and when published. All the best!

Jan 09 '15
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Mohit Charnalia

Thanks for reading Rajshree...

Jan 10 '15
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Rajshree Chauhan

definitely*

Jan 09 '15
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Khushboo

Holes in the underwear of a Superhero... easy to relate in the Indian context. Very well written. Would love to read the book if published.

Jan 02 '15
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Mohit Charnalia

Thanks for reading Khushboo

Jan 10 '15
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P. Basu

After a long time, a book in English that combines Wodehouse humour & an enticing plot. The author's strength lies in descriptions - you can imagine the cramped growing up of Samir in the one bed room Noida flat, or experience the summer in Arnab's garden - he transports you to their world. The dialogues are crisp yet conveys everything. Riveting first 3 chapters - trailer is good & now await the complete book.

Jan 02 '15
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sunil

Very interesting . I felt as if I was watching a movie on celluloid. Story of a boy next door who has had a childhood like many of us in 70s and 80s, makes it big through sheer hard work and....... I am awaiting this "and" anxiously...

Jan 01 '15
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Pratima

Captivating story telling style...Once I was on 1st chapter, couldn't keep it down..can't wait for the book to be published to read the entire book....extremely entertaining...Good luck to the writer..

Dec 31 '14
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Brij Bhushan

Simple q: would I want to read the entire book? Simple straight forward ans: Yes, definitely. From the available chapters, it appears a fantastic read, sp. while one is travelling, - nice and easy with familiarity in set-up. Thumbs up to the writer and "Bloody Good Book".

Dec 29 '14
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Pravin Mahajan

Diwali Boy's Last Dance reads well. The writing style is straightforward yet evocative, certainly for our generation. It is not pretentious which is a trap some fall into for their first endeavor. A few of the situations are prosaic in middle-class India, like the bribery incident at home or the Arnab-Nisha interactions, and I think Samir's character and feelings can be further strengthened. Maybe this builds up in the subsequent chapters. Am, though, eager to get to the last dance.

Dec 25 '14
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Anmol Bajaj

Riveting read....the writer makes it easy to connect with the characters....highly recommended

Dec 22 '14
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Namita Charnalia

Fantastic start....reading only the first three chapters has left me wanting to read the entire book...the writing style makes for easy reading, samir stays with you long after you have stopped reading
...would definitely read the book if published...

Dec 18 '14
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mitash

Extremely entertaining narrative and loaded with intricate humour. This one will be an UNPUTDOWNABLE for sure, Hope to see it on the stands soon!!!

Dec 17 '14
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Madhvi Vaswani

Enjoyed reading about Samir Bhantnagar's life through Mohit Charnalias brilliant writing. Some of the analogies used were hilarious and very creative.. The end of the third chapter left me wanting more.. waiting to see how his life unfolds. Specially loved the writing style which made for an easy read, not to forget the subject of the book which is relevant and written in an interesting way. Kudos to the author Mohit Charnalia. Will definitely buy the book!

Dec 17 '14
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Deepa Iyyer

I like books laced with humour. This was one of them. Very good job done by the writer. I was definitely left wanting to read more of this.

Dec 17 '14
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Suneel Sharma

nice read, a definite buy within hours of publishing. I hope next chapters brings some learning for young corporate enthusiasts

Dec 15 '14
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Raghuvir Mukherji

This excerpt heralds the arrival of a brilliant new author. Samir Bhatnagar's backgound is fascinatingly detailed through anecdotes: one in the form of a daily ritual in the Puja room and the other in the form of a single episode where the young Samir watches his father steadfastly refuse to engage in an act of corruption in the face of both enticement and contemptuous ridicule. Mohit Charnalia's excerpt definitely looks very promising, and left me wanting for more. This is how English is meant to be written, and yes, even in an Indian setting.

Dec 14 '14
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Vivek Kumar

Awesome fast paced page turner! Will buy, if published.

Dec 14 '14
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